Apple

Damson

Plum

Pear

Cherry

Gage

Apple Trees

The fertile lowlands of Scotland particularly the Carse of Gowrie between Perth and Dundee and the Clyde Valley, were significant producers of apples until the late 19th Century. Sadly many commercial orchards were abandoned as cheaper imports from overseas increased.

Apples are relatively easy to grow in a domestic garden. They are very hardy, so will not be affected by even the coldest of Scottish winters. Apples prefer to be grown in a sunny spot, to maximize the time for the fruit to ripen. The site should not be waterlogged, nor the soil too acidic, and should not be too exposed to harsh winds. Late Spring frosts can damage the apple blossom, leading to reduced fruit production, so choose later flowering varieties or those with good frost resistance of the blossom if you live in a frost pocket.

Common apple diseases include canker and scab, which can affect the health of your fruit tree and quality of the fruit. Both are fungal diseases and can be active during warm wet conditions during Spring and early Summer and the potential for infection can be reduced by choosing more disease resistant varieties.

Bramley 20

A compact version of the Bramley cooking apple, it is less vigorous but has heavier crops.
Frost resistant blossom. Recommended.

Cook

Eat/cook

Oct

Pick

No

Self-fertile?

C3

Poll. Gp.

Christmas Pippin

An exceptionally high quality eating apple.

Crops heavily and easy to grow.

Eat

Eat/cook

Oct

Pick

No

Self-fertile?

C3

Poll. Gp.

Cox Self Fertile

The original Cox apple but self-fertile. Good for less than ideal Cox northern areas, but can be prone to canker and scab in wetter areas. Generally produces heavy crops.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Oct

Yes

C3

Discovery

An excellent early apple with good disease resistance and frost resistant blossom. Crisp and juicy, keeps well. Recommended for northern areas of UK. AGM.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Aug

No

C3

Egremont Russet

A sweet and firm eating apple with a nutty flavour. Frost resistant blossom. Resistant to scab.
Good for northern UK. AGM.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Oct

No

C2

James Grieve

A very popular old Scottish variety.Crisp and juicy, with a sharp flavour; reliable cropper.
Slightly susceptible to canker and scab.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat/cook

Sept

Yes

C3

Red Devil

Good disease resistance. The fruits have a deep scarlet colour and strawberry flavour.
Makes pink juice. Recommended.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Sept

Yes

C3

Red Falstaff

Frost resistant blossom, good flavour, heavy crops and keeps well; good for juice.
Fairly resistant to canker and scab. Recommended.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Oct

Yes

C3

Red Windsor

Superb flavour apple, heavy crops. Disease resistant and some frost resistance of the blossom.
Recommended.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Sept

Yes

C2

Scotch Bridget

A Scottish heritage cooking apple. Good disease resistance. Large fruit with cream crisp flesh.
Recommended.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Cook

Sept

No

C2

Scrumptious

Good frost resistant blossom. Scrumptious has an excellent flavour and as it is  thin-skinned it is good for children; heavy cropper. AGM. Recommended.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Sept

Yes

C3

Sunset

A hardier version of Cox' Orange Pippin, with better disease and frost resistance.
Good for northern UK and wetter areas. AGM.

Eat/cook

Pick

Self-fertile?

Poll. Gp.

Eat

Sept

No

C3

Notes

Trees are supplied bare rooted during their dormant season (usually from mid-November to the end of March depending on the weather). It is recommended that bare root trees are planted within a day or two of arrival but they may be stored for longer in a cool place or 'heeled' in to a mound or pot of compost until you are ready for planting. Don't allow the roots to dry out or freeze - wrap in hessian or other insulating material if necessary.  Soak the roots before planting and water in well.

AGM - The Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit (AGM) helps home gardeners make informed choices about plants. It is only awarded to a plant that meets the following criteria:

  • Outstanding excellence for ordinary garden decoration or use
  • Good constitution
  • Does not require highly specialist growing conditions or care
  • Not particularly susceptible to any pest or disease

Rootstocks

Very vigorous (Ultimate height ~4m) – m25

Semi-vigorous (Ultimate height 3 – 3.5m) – mm106,
Quince A, SJA, Colt (Wavit is midway between SJA and VVA-1)

Semi-dwarf (Ultimate 2.5 – 3m) – m26

Dwarf (Ultimate height 2 - 2.5m) - m9

Very dwarf (Ultimate height 1.5 - 2m) - m27

More dwarf (m9 and m26) rootstocks are suitable for cordoning

Specification

Maiden (mdn) – 1 yr old tree 1 to 2m in height; may be feathered depending on variety and root. A Knip is similar.

Bush (bush) - well formed head on a clean stem, 2 years old

Half Standard (hst) - Clear stem of 1m supporting a well branched head, 2-3 years old

Standard (std) - Clear stem of 1.75m supporting a well branched head, 2-3 years old

Cordon (cdn) - 2 year old trees with a trained central leader, spur pruned.

Pollination

You will need a tree (of a different variety) to cross-pollinate with, for those trees which are not self-fertile. The cross-pollinator should belong to a pollination group the same or either side of the tree to be pollinated (i.e. for a C1 you would need a C2; for a C2 a C1, C2 or C3 would be required). Triploid varieties (e.g. Bramley) require two pollinators.

Let us help you make the most of your garden!

Bennybeg Plant Centre

Muthill Road, Crieff, Perthshire, PH7 4HN

Tel. 01764 656345

E. enquiries@bennybeg.co.uk

Bennybeg Plant Centre is an independent garden centre near
Crieff, Perthshire, run by people who are passionate about plants.

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